Welcome to Acts of Composition

My name is Kim Haimes-Korn.  I am a Professor in the Department of English  at Kennesaw State University.  I have been teaching composition for a long time and have watched the field move and change.  Now, when we teach writing we teach it so students gain rhetorical awareness — of their purposes, audiences, subjects and contexts.  So, instead of teaching writing as a series of forms and formats, we teach students to analyze and switch their language and approach based on the communication situations in which they find themselves.  With the digital tools available to us now, we can extend our meaning making opportunities through new lenses such as images, texts, gestures, music, and multimedia. Students write for the real world and participate in  “Acts of Composition” that ask them to analyze and compose multimodal texts for participatory and academic audiences.

It is with this spirit that I launch this page ~ The spirit that moves the imagination and involves us in the complicated, exciting adventure of what it means to compose in our world today.

The purpose of this site is to explore, share and showcase students’ acts of composition.  Like all writing, it is a work in progress and always under revision. Check back as I expand the site with new classroom projects and student voices.

 

Image courtesy of Creative Commons.

3 Responses to Welcome to Acts of Composition

  1. Terry Simone says:

    Thanks for share, Kim
    Your website is tres impressive! Congrats, Terry

  2. Kim,
    I read your informative post featured at Macmillan’s site and downloaded your “Exploratory Writing for Multimodal Blog Posts.” I will give you full acknowledgement when I use a variation of it with my students in freshman composition. The summary you provide is particularly helpful and specific in terms of expectations. I also appreciate that you linked to a student’s blog for examples. Between your post and another from Faculty Focus Faculty Focus, I am beginning this semester with some new ways to engage the students. Thank you for your inspiration.

    • admin says:

      Great. Thanks. Glad you found the post useful. Let me know how you are using them in your classroom and how they work for you and your students.

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