Capstone Projects

Center for Civil and Human Rights – https://www.civilandhumanrights.org/

The Rhetoric of U.S. Social Movements: Capstone Projects 

In the Spring of 2019, I taught a senior capstone class, The Rhetoric of U.S. Social Movements.  In this course, students engaged with the primary texts of major U.S. social movements including the abolishionist, women’s suffrage, civil rights, and LGBTQ movements along with other contemporary movments.  Students used rhetorical theory to analyze the rhetorical practices of these movements and their ability to affect change.

Students composed an independent researched argument in which they engaged in an extended rhetorical analysis of some facet of a U.S. social movement.  Many also connected the primary, historical texts with contemporary social movements. They found varied and interesting directions and subjects throught this project. Students composed both a traditional academic paper and an interactive digital version for different audiences.

Check out their final digital versions which also include a PDF link to the academic paper.  I have included all the students who gave me permission in alphabetical order.  The texts are interactive and nonlinear, so navigate through the drop down menu and within the documents. Enjoy.

Aneka Bailey – Demonizing and Sexualizing Black Women

Megan Bailey – Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Feminine Style

Alysia Bell – Storytelling and the Movement for Change  

Joe Conningham – The Evolution of Educational Oppression 

Demilya Jordan – Why Are Black Women So Angry

Marisa Kipping – The Internal Struggle: The Difference in Rhetorical Approach in Moderate and Radical Leaders

Sam Lawrence – #minimalism

Eric Merriweather – Good and True Outcomes in a Paradigm of Accepted Violence

Emily Mimbs – The Right to Education: The Fight for Bilingual Education Act and Beyond 

Sophie Normil – Women’s Rights in the U.S and UK

Haley Sanders – The Rhetoric of School Shootings and Gun Culture in the United States

Kelsi Shobe – The Shared Rhetoric of Seemingly Disconnected Movements 

Kennedy Smith – Women’s Rights through Visual Media

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